External supervisors and the small world therapists live in

Supervision is a topic I am super passionate about. I believe you should get a minimum of 1 hour of clinical supervision every month. I’m getting 1.5 hours of line management every month, 1 hour of work funded external supervision every 6 weeks, and 1 hour of self-funded external supervision every 4-6 weeks. I used to attend a monthly group supervision (that has since been discontinued). I also co-facilitate caseworker group supervision across 3 offices (but I’m not counting that since I’m not a supervisee).

That’s a lot of supervision. I know.

When I used to work full-time in two separate organisations I had another 2 supervisors on top of that. Messy!

In my speciality of relationship and systemic therapy (with an attachment lens) there’s not a lot of options for supervisors with a degree (mostly Masters due to the limited study options too) and at least 10 years of experience under their belt. I also had some additional criteria – I needed them to have enough degrees of separation from my organisations I want to work for in the future, my current managers, most of my co-workers, etc. You get the picture.

When I was researching potential clinical supervisors in Sydney I had a very short list. I think it was about 6 names – maybe less. I had to cross someone out because they literally worked in my role previously and my line manager was not keen. I crossed off another two people because they lived too far north for me. I crossed off another because they were running group supervision for one of my workplaces. So I had 2 people left over.

It’s been about a year since and through training/work/etc I’ve noted a few more names but it’s still a small group. I’ve attended enough state-wide and national conferences/trainings to know the key players. Word of mouth is both a huge advantage and also very dangerous! A trainer I liked recommended a supervisor I loved, and on the other side at the national conference a group of family therapy leaders recommended a supervisor I had tried earlier and totally flopped with.

Supervision IS NOT just about finding solutions, solving problems and double checking what you’ve done.

Supervision IS about building a relationship of mutual trust and respect. Supervision is a relationship where you are supported to grow.

Supervision’s goal is to create and maintain a long term relationship where you feel emotionally safe enough to expose your vulnerabilities as a person and as a professional, where you are open to be challenged, and comfortable to ask questions about what your supervisor said. It’s about having passionate theoretical and ethical debates, unpacking a session where you would have done everything differently, having someone who you see as an expect recognise your skills and identity as a therapist, where you can grieve and celebrate cases.

It’s about finding the right fit like Goldilocks. Trial and error. I definitely feel different levels of comfort and trust towards different supervisors. Some supervisors are more structured and holding in their approach which can create a sense of safety and security in the space you share. You trust in their ability to contain you. Some are more practical and task based, and provide less emotional support. In contrast, others may not have strong enough boundaries and try pull you into being their emotional drama. In the supervisor-supervisee relationships there can be a variety of dynamics and dangers that occur in any dyad.

I also love peer supervision which I don’t have in my current role – I’ll take a look at options out there or even look at starting my own peer supervision group where we can meet up once of month after work or on the weekend.


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